Fashion 'Rules' Are Made to be Broken

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“That, to me, is a life goal. To be so confident and established in myself and my clothes that I can literally wear anything I like, no matter how ‘crazy’ it may seem to others.”

By Henrietta Easton

Image from The Ragged Priest

‘But blue and green should never be seen!’. ‘No way, you can never wear white and cream together’. ‘That shirt is way too frilly for that skirt’. ‘But the patterns clash, and so do the colours!’. The word ‘never’ in fashion should be avoided at all costs. Here I am sat wearing two different variations of cream and one of white thinking that this might be the best outfit I have worn in a while. The harsh truth is anyone that makes a statement like the above, and I am definitely guilty of it in the past, is simply too afraid to step out of their comfort zone and make what they might consider to be a ‘fashion faux pas.’ The best thing about fashion ‘rules’ is that they are not real and are made to be broken. If we all stuck to them style would never change and we would all look the same. That sounds tiresome and boring to me. Wouldn’t you rather make a mistake and either learn from it and move on, or discover that that ‘mistake’ might just be the best fashion decision you ever made?

When I had the idea for this piece I was not entirely sure where it had come from until I realised how much Gossip Girl I had been watching recently (for about the 500th time). The style queen that is Blair Waldorf breaks a whole host of fashion ‘rules’ that many, many people had sworn should never be broken. She frequently clashes patterns, occasionally wears head to toe one pattern (red tartan in series two), wears frills on frills on frills whilst clashing colours and never adheres to the ‘statement earrings means you can’t wear a necklace’ rule. Generally, when it comes to Blair’s style more is always more and that is definitely something I can get behind.

She frequently clashes patterns, occasionally wears head to toe one pattern (red tartan in series two), wears frills on frills on frills whilst clashing colours and never adheres to the ‘statement earrings means you can’t wear a necklace’ rule.

The best thing about Blair’s style is that when she is wearing these outfits (that us mere mortals would never feel brave enough to) it is barely noticeable that she looks so different to everyone else. Her personality shines through and her outrageous style is a part of her and helps her to be herself, so much so that you don’t notice how outrageous the clothes really are, they just make sense. That, to me, is a life goal. To be so confident and established in myself and my clothes that I can literally wear anything I like, no matter how ‘crazy’ it may seem to others. I want people to simply say ‘yeah that’s her, doesn’t she look great?’ Rather than ‘omg what is she wearing?’.

I realise that this is a big ask, mostly because I am not Blair Waldorf and I do not live in the upper east side of New York, nor am I the daughter of a world famous (albeit fictional) designer, but my point is that anything that you may have considered ‘over the line’ is worth giving a try, even if it is simply small things. Try something like wearing clashing patterns, wearing socks with sandals (sparkly, obviously) or double denim. Once you start realising that those ‘rules’ are made up by people who don’t truly understand style, you’ll feel free.

I have a multicoloured sequin dress to wear to new years that I am pairing with sparkly tights, opened toed sandals, a whole load of jewellery and Carrie Bradshaw hair. Will I stand out from the crowd? Probably. Is that a good thing? Definitely.