My Graduate Reality and Why You Should Never Give Up on Your Dream Job

graduatereality.jpg

My plan was always to keep applying and getting relevant experience whilst working to make it easier to eventually move to a role in which I was more passionate about, but, you guessed it, it didn’t work like that.

Words by Jess Morcom

I’m pretty sure I can’t recall a time when I haven’t wanted to be successful. Even when I was very young and wasn’t sure if I wanted to be a journalist when I grew up, I always knew that I was a small girl with big dreams. I think the older you get the more you hope your life will just “work itself out” and you’ll find yourself on your chosen career path. Obviously, once adulthood kicks in we soon realise that that’s not the case. Even when I started University I remember most of my course mates were hopeful that they would end up graduating and being able to work for the BBC straight away. Come to graduation however, and 2/3 of them still had no clue, and weren’t even sure they wanted to stay in the same field of study. Having managed to gain a CV full of relevant placements, as the end of Uni approached I still had my heart set on the journalism and media industry. Although living in the South West of England wasn’t always the forefront of the bigger jobs in the media industry anyway, I’ve always been fairly certain it has the potential to be a start. In the midst of applying for graduate journalism roles I came across an opportunity to earn a full time income in an office job. I accepted this, and it meant that I could start working straight after I finished uni, something plenty of graduates don’t have the opportunity to do. At the time I thought that being able to earn a full time wage no matter what I was doing was something to be proud of, and it still is to an extent, I’ve certainly learned a great deal and grown as a character since I officially started adulting.

I think the older you get the more you hope your life will just “work itself out” and you’ll find yourself on your chosen career path. Obviously, once adulthood kicks in we soon realise that that’s not the case.

My plan was always to keep applying and getting relevant experience whilst working to make it easier to eventually move to a role in which I was more passionate about, but, you guessed it, it didn’t work like that. 18 months later, plenty of job applications, multiple interviews, and a few very near misses to my dream job, here I am still in the same role I started straight after Uni.

I have recently changed my attitude at work and moved departments which has definitely helped me not to feel so downtrodden, but the past year of my working life hasn’t been as career driving as I’d imagined in my mind. Most of my close friends that went to university are now in a similar role to what they had always had in mind, and some of my course mates are working in the media industry. I say some because I know I’m by no means alone and I always try to think about how fortunate I am to have a 9-5 job that others would dream of. That being said, it has not stopped the sheer disappointment I have felt at being told for the 10th time “Unfortunately, you have not been successful at this time, we wish you the best of luck in the future with your job search”. I’ve always received great feedback and been told that I only narrowly missed out on a few roles, but still it becomes degrading and draining to be disappointed over and over again, especially when you tried your best.  It hasn’t been easy but I have learned that I cannot let the rejection defeat me.

I went through a stage a few months ago where I had almost given up on the Journalist dream and accepted that I was going to be an office girl for the rest of my life and that I need to learn to be ok with that, but then I remembered, I couldn’t disappoint 13 year old me who decided that one day she wanted to be the editor of Vogue Magazine. I had to keep trying, keep writing, and keep applying. So that’s exactly what I did and recently I  received the call I was waiting for “Congratulations, we would like to offer you a job” – and suddenly everything fell into place. My determination and the times I had to continuously pick myself up when I felt like falling finally seem worth it now. As I prepare to embark on my new career as a local journalist, I couldn’t be more hopeful for the future.

I hope anyone reading this that feels like they will never get their chance to shine doesn’t give up, the time will come when you least expect it.