Mirror Mirror: A Look Into Vogue's September 2019 Cover

Many a thing has been said already about the faces, or forces, of change adorning the cover of HRH the Duchess of Sussex’s guest-edited September Issue of British Vogue. The Duchess is undoubtedly a force of change in her own right, as Edward Enninful, the magazine’s Editor-in- Chief, has rightfully pointed out. Interestingly enough, the Duchess has decided to not grace the cover herself, instead making space to give an additional platform for and raise awareness to the 15 trailblazing women who inspire her. 

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Empower Yourself for Yourself, Not Others

"I need to be confident, I cannot let Lizzo down.” Now, at first, that seemed like a very valid thing to be thinking. Lizzo, a singer Paper Magazine dubbed as “Body Positive Queen of 2018”, has not only been taking the music industry by storm, but has continuously stood up for crucial causes in our current society and environment. Calling her a body positivity advocate, in my opinion, honestly doesn't do the singer justice. She has been vocal about so much more, including gender and sexuality, mental health and media representation.

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No, I Won’t Regret My Tattoos and Here’s Why

I love it when people want to learn about the experience of getting a tattoo or want to find a good artist and respect the idea that some tattoos can have strong sentimental values, whilst others have no meaning at all. But, when regret is the main topic of discussion surrounding tattoos and what I have chosen to do with my body, it feels somewhat disrespectful. I know people don’t mean any harm by asking this question, they’re just curious because tattoos are a lifelong commitment. This question is just a big pet peeve of mine. So, instead of having to continuously answer if I will regret my tattoos I have decided to write this article because the answer to this question is a solid no. I will never regret my tattoos and this is how I know I will never regret them. 

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Chasing the Myth of the Ideal Day

There is no denying that I am very prone to spending hours on YouTube watching everything from "a day in my life" to "how to become a morning person". I've always been fascinated by the concept of a perfect daily routine. I have even dipped my toe into the whole experience of planning out my 'ideal day’ - yoga, meditation, unachievable wake-up calls and bedtime included. Whenever I have tried to follow this 'ideal day' of mine, composed by the routines that I am sure work wonderfully for others, my day turned out to be less than perfect. If anything, those days left me feeling unmotivated and unproductive more so than a typical day. 

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7 Down-To-Earth Influencers to Follow When the Instagram Game is Getting You Down

Instagram is a scary and exciting place at the same time. While acting as a hub for creativity and inspiration, it simultaneously fuels self-hatred and embeds comparison into the forefront of our mind-set. Although many say that deleting out accounts or limiting our access is the way to eliminate the negative impacts of this social platform, I believe that if we use Instagram correctly, in a way that benefits our mental health, it can be something we are happy using every day.

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Does the Colour Pink Really Effect Our Ability to be Strong?

During the Women's World Cup I came across a story that had my eyebrows raised in intrigue, but also in speculation. A photographic art piece by Juno Calypso captured bloodied and bruised female football players in a millennial pink changing room for ULTRA’s ‘Art for the Women’s World Cup’ shown at the J Hammond Projects Gallery in London. The piece was based on Norwich City’s controversial move to paint their away changing room pink for the 2018-19 season. This was in a bid to lower their opponents testosterone levels, therefore making the football team calmer and easier to defeat.

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Are Women’s Magazines Today Less Feminist Than in the 18th Century?

One of the first female targeted magazine’s in Britain, and arguably the most successful of its time, was entitled ‘The Lady’s Magazine: Or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex Appropriated Solely for their Use and Amusement.’ Running from 1770-1832 in a time before any indication of an attempt at gender equality in Britain, the magazine in its first few years was actually surprisingly dissimilar to many gossip women’s magazines we see today and beared more resemblance to our modern independent zines that are often based around feminism.

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Alabama's Anti-Abortion Law: The Alabama Senate vs Human Rights

1 in 4 women have had an abortion. To put that into perspective, that’s about 7 of your classmates at school or university, 37 people in a full movie theatre screening, or 20 people on a full double decker bus. It could mean one person in your friendship group or one person in your immediate family. It means several of your school teachers, your neighbours and your colleagues at work. It means that a lot of people you know have sought medical care for an unwanted pregnancy and they have every right to do so.

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